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Advice

Our easy to follow step-by-step guides have been developed to help you achieve stunning results every time.

How To Fit Wainscot Wall Cladding

A step-by-step guide to fitting wainscot wall cladding, using Richard Burbidge pine board and basic woodworking tools and techniques. Step 1. Calculate amount of cladding required To calculate the amount of cladding required, you must measure the height and width of the area to be clad. Next, determine the installed width of your chosen cladding, remember this will be less than face width due to the overlap at the joints. Divide the area to be clad by the installed width of the cladding, then round up this figure to get the amount of pieces required. Lastly, determine the amount of pieces you will get out of each plank of cladding, when cladding to wainscot height, you may get two or more pieces out of each plank. Divide the amount of pieces required by amount of pieces you will use per plank, this will give you the amount of cladding planks required for your project. At Richard Burbidge, we have a selection of high-quality cladding options to choose from. Select our pine cladding when painting, or white oak cladding for a natural look. For this project we are using DEC6009 which is our 9 x 95 x 2400mm pine tongue and groove cladding.  Step 2. Decide on installation method If your wall is smooth and flat, you can fit cladding directly onto the wall using a strong grab adhesive. If your wall is dusty, use a diluted PVA adhesive beforehand and allow time for it to dry. When working with strong adhesives, ensure to properly ventilate the room and wear a mask. If your wall is uneven you can install battens first to fit the cladding onto. Fit battens around the perimeter of the area to be clad, ensure you use a spirit level when fitting the battens. Then, infill the area with battens, spaced at a maximum of 30cm from centre to centre. If you are fitting your cladding vertically, fit the battens horizontally and vice versa. If an area of your wall is uneven, you'll need to use thin pieces of wood off-cuts behind the battens, to keep the surface flat. Ensure you use a pipe and cable detector before nailing or drilling into any walls. Step 3. Cut cladding to length Take a spirit level and mark the desired height of the cladding onto the wall. Use the width of the cladding to work out where each piece will begin and end, including the overlap at the joint. If there is a considerable overlap, you will need to cut the first and last piece down to balance the end widths. When cutting down the first and last piece, ensure you are cutting the correct side of the cladding so it is still able to join together.   Next, measure your cladding to your desired length and cut each piece with a universal panel saw. Step 4. Add a decorative finish Before fitting your cladding, finish all of the faces and edges. This project can be customised to work with any décor and colour scheme. When working with raw cladding, you can choose to paint, stain, or wax. Make sure to check the instructions of your finishing products.  If you selected pre-finished cladding then you won’t need to add any decorative finishes, and you can skip this step. You can also choose to add a dado rail to the top of the cladding to give a clean seamless finish, ensure to paint or finish to match your cladding prior to installation. Step 5. Fit your cladding   Slot the first piece of cladding into place to ensure the size is correct. Next, apply grab adhesive to the back of the cladding putting a generous amount of adhesive 10cm in from each end and spaced at 30cm intervals. Slot into place, and use a spirit level to ensure it is straight. Then, fit all the remaining cut pieces in the same way. For the last piece, slide it into place from above and don’t apply grab adhesive as it will get onto the wall. Next, seal the gap between the top of the cladding and wall with decorators caulk for a secure fit. If you have chosen to add a decorative dado rail to the top of the cladding, fit by following the same steps as fitting cladding, and seal the gap at the top with decorators caulk.   Step 6. Share your DIY renovation project We love seeing how you have transformed your home with Richard Burbidge. Upload a picture of your DIY project to Instagram or Facebook and tag us @richard_burbidge. You can also upload your images to our testimonials page here. We can’t wait to see what you create with Richard Burbidge mouldings!

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How to Make and Fit a Pine Board Shelf

A step-by-step guide to making and fitting a pine board shelf, using Richard Burbidge pine board and basic woodworking tools and techniques. Step 1. Choose your pine board and brackets Firstly you’ll need to decide the style you’re going for – we recommend our pine board for this project. Our flat sheet pine panels are available in a variety of different sizes and thicknesses, with a board to suit every requirement. View our selection of pine board here. You will also need to select your brackets, which can be found at any hardware store. Opt for metal brackets for an on-trend industrial style, or select timber brackets for a natural and rustic look. For the more advanced DIY enthusiasts, you may opt to create your own timber brackets. You can do this using pine board and a coping saw. Also consider the weight of the items you will be placing on the shelf, you will need to select heavy duty brackets for weighted items. Step 2. Cut to size and add your creative flair to your shelf Depending on the size of pine board you have selected, you may wish to cut your pine board to your desired length. You can do this using a mitre box and saw.  Next, if you wish to decorate your shelving, you can either paint, wax or stain depending on your desired look. For a smooth finish you can sand down your pine board with an electric sander. You can also add a decorative cover around your shelf, you can do this using decorative mouldings. We used DEC6014 for a more put together finish. View our range of decorative mouldings here. These steps are entirely optional and all depend on the final look you are striving for. This project can be customised to work with any décor, in any room. There’s an endless list of ways that you could choose to add your own creative flair. Step 3. Decide where to place your shelves Next, consider where you will be placing your shelves. Ensure you use a pipe and cable detector before nailing or drilling into any walls. You must also consider the type of wall you have. When fixing to a masonry wall you will need a masonry drill and wall plugs. If fixing to a stud wall, use a stud detector to locate the vertical timber studs, you will not require wall plugs with a stud wall. Ensure that you wear safety glasses and gloves when drilling. Step 4. Fit brackets to wall We recommend fitting the brackets to the wall first. Use a spirit level to make sure your bracket is straight, mark the holes onto the wall with a pencil, and then drill into the wall. Fit wall plugs into the drilled holes if you have masonry walls. Then, fit the bracket into the drilled holes by using screws and a screw driver. Repeat this process for the other bracket, again using a spirit level to ensure the brackets are perfectly aligned. Step 5. Fit board to brackets Next, hold up your pine board onto your brackets to determine where the bracket holes will be on your pine board. Take a pencil and mark these holes. Remove the pine board, and drill pilot holes into the shelf, ensuring you don’t drill through the board. Lastly, attach the board with screws and your shelf should be up and ready! Step 6. Share your DIY renovation project We love seeing how you have transformed your home with Richard Burbidge. Upload a picture of your DIY project to Instagram or Facebook and tag us @richard_burbidge. You can also upload your images to our testimonials page here. We can’t wait to see what you create with Richard Burbidge mouldings!

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How To Make a Clothes Stand

A step-by-step guide to creating a DIY clothing stand, using Richard Burbidge mouldings and basic woodworking tools and techniques. This project is so versatile and can be used in any room, from a towel stand in the bathroom, a coat rack in the hallway, to a clothing stand in the bedroom. This project can be completed within an hour, and is perfect as a first DIY project. 1. Choose your Richard Burbidge moulding Firstly you’ll need to decide the style you’re going for – we recommend our dowel mouldings for this project. Richard Burbidge mouldings are of the highest quality and can totally transform the look and character of a whole room. If you are going for a contemporary style we recommend painting, our pine dowel works best with paint. To achieve a natural Scandinavian look, use our light hardwood dowel and opt for staining to achieve a professional finish. View our full range of dowels here. 2. Cut the dowels to length Next, we must decide on the height of the clothing stand, we recommend cutting the dowels to 1500mm which is just under 6 foot, this would be the ideal height for most homes. If the clothing stand is for a children’s room you may want to cut the dowel slightly smaller, 1100mm would be ideal for most children. You can make your own adjustments to the height if necessary. Using a tape measure, mark your chosen measurement onto the dowels. Using a panel saw carefully cut the dowel at a 90 degree angle along the line you have drawn. Repeat this process to the four dowels, then lightly sand the ends until smooth. 3. Add your own creative flare This project can be customised to work with any décor, in any room. There are many different ways you can add your own creative flare to this project. You can paint each dowel a different colour, paint dots or stripes onto the dowels, or even draw your own unique design to really make the clothing stand your own. There’s an endless list of ways that you could choose to add your own creative flair, but remember to sand first and always follow the paint manufacturer’s instructions which may require you to prime before painting. 4. Tie the dowels together Next, you will need to tie the dowels together. Like painting, there are dozens of different materials you can choose to use, with rope being the most sturdy and secure. You can use any material as long as it is strong enough to hold the dowels together, this could be some leather or ribbon that matches your décor. Once you have decided on the material, gather the dowels together, tightly wrap the rope around the dowels approximately 45cm from the top, and tie them in a secure double knot. Stand the dowels up and evenly separate. 5. Place your stand in its new home The last step is to decide where you are going to place your new clothing stand. This project is so versatile and would work well in any room, from a towel stand in the bathroom, a coat rack in the hallway, to a clothing stand in the bedroom, this project is perfect for all homes. The best part about this project is that the stand can also be folded down and stored away ready to bring out to impress your guests and hold their coats.

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How To Fit Scotia Beading

A step-by-step guide to fitting scotia beading, using Richard Burbidge mouldings and basic woodworking tools and techniques. Wood flooring and laminate flooring require an expansion gap around the perimeter of the room as they naturally expand and contract. Scotia is a decorative moulding used to cover this expansion gap without removing the skirting board. 1. Choose your Richard Burbidge moulding Firstly you’ll need to decide the style you’re going for – we offer a wide range of scotia bead styles, from decorative to minimalist. Richard Burbidge mouldings are of the highest quality and can totally transform the look and character of a whole room. View our full range of flooring mouldings here.  Top tip: Select a scotia style and colour that matches the skirting board for a cohesive look. Measure the perimeter of your room to determine the total length of scotia required, then add another 10-20% for wastage. 2. Cutting the moulding When joining two ends of scotia beading together, they will need to be cut to a mitre joint, this means cutting at a 45 degree angle for a seamless finish. For internal and external corners measure the distance to the next corner and mark onto the back of the scotia, and the intended direction of the mitre cut. Next, use a mitre box and mitre saw at a 45-degree angle mitre cut in the marked direction. Then cut the adjoining scotia to make a mitre cut in the opposite direction, sand both mitred ends until smooth. Hold both mitred ends together ensuring they fit properly. If the fit isn’t exact you can use a block plane to shave down the ends to achieve a better fit. 3. Fitting a return For installations where the end of the scotia is exposed, such as next to a door, you can fit a return to the exposed end of the scotia for a neater finish. Firstly, make a mitre cut to the exposed end of the scotia. Next, complete a mitre cut on another piece of scotia in the opposite direction to the previous mitre cut, then cut this small piece to size. Ensure it fits into the exposed end of scotia, then apply PVA to the mitre and fit the return onto the scotia and flush to the wall. 4. Securing the moulding to the wall You can opt for nails which offers a more reliable hold, or adhesive which allows for a more clean and professional finish. To fit scotia using nails, secure into position by nailing the scotia to the skirting by spacing one nail every 30cm, ensure you don’t nail the scotia to the floor. To fit scotia using adhesive, apply grab adhesive to the back of the scotia and carefully apply to the wall, ensuring not to get any on your flooring. Apply PVA to any external mitres. Use flexible decorators caulk to fill any gaps between the top of the scotia and skirting, wipe any excess with a damp cloth to smooth the surface. 5. Add the finishing touches Once the scotia is applied, use decorators caulk to patch any gaps, cracks, or holes prior to finishing. If you have selected pine scotia, there are many different finishing options, you can stain for a traditional look, paint for a contemporary finish, or choose to retain the original look of raw pine. These little finishing touches are where you can tie in with your chosen décor and match your existing skirting. If you decide to stain or leave as it is, we recommend sealing the surface with a varnish or oil. 6. Share your DIY renovation project We love seeing how you have transformed your home with Richard Burbidge. Upload a picture of your DIY project to Instagram or Facebook and tag us @richard_burbidge. You can also upload your images to our testimonials page here. We can’t wait to see what you create with Richard Burbidge mouldings!  

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How To Fit Wall Panelling

A step-by-step guide to creating a feature wall within your home, using Richard Burbidge mouldings and basic woodworking tools and techniques. There are hundreds of different designs you can create with wall panelling, in this guide we are going to be showing you how to install the classic but contemporary square panel design that goes from floor to ceiling, to create a feature wall. 1. Planning and measuring Planning is the most time consuming, but also the most important step of the whole process. Firstly, you will need to measure the walls every length and width, making a note of any fittings and fixtures you will need to avoid. Draw your design with the measurements on some paper, making sure to plan an equal gap horizontally and vertically. The next step is to transfer your measurements and plan to the wall, using a pencil, tape measure and laser level, mark where each panel piece will be, while bearing in mind the width of the panel. We also recommend removing skirting and architrave on the feature wall to achieve a professional finish.  2. Choose your Richard Burbidge moulding Richard Burbidge mouldings are of the highest quality and can totally transform the look and character of a whole room. Our stripwood range has a vast selection of panel sizes to choose from. For this project we are using STW6027 which is a 12 x 96 x 2400mm pine panel that creates the classic square feature wall you will have seen everywhere on Pinterest and Instagram! 3. Cut the panels to length The next step is to cut your panels to length. Our stripwood mouldings are 2400mm in length which is the average height of most rooms, so you won’t need to cut the mouldings that are being placed vertically. Using a saw and mitre box at a 90 degree angle, carefully cut the panels that will be horizontally placed according to the measurements you noted from step 1. Repeat this process to all of the horizontal panels, then lightly sand the ends until smooth. If your wall is not 2400mm in length then you will need to cut the moulding according to your walls measurements using this same method. 4. Apply panels to the wall When applying the panels to the wall start with the vertical panels, then the horizontal panels. To apply the panels to the wall we recommend nails and adhesive for that extra security and hold. Place your panel onto the wall where you marked out in step 1, use a laser level to ensure the panel is straight, then apply strong hold adhesive to the back and apply to the wall, next use a nail gun to fully secure the panel to the wall. Repeat this process for all panels. Ensure you use a pipe and cable detector before nailing or drilling into any walls. If you are unsure if it is safe to nail into your wall, opt for a strong adhesive instead.  Once you have applied the panels, use decorators caulk to patch any gaps, cracks, or holes, then sand prior to finishing. 5. Add your own creative flare This project can be customised to work with any décor and colour scheme. There are many different ways you can add your own creative flare to this project. You can choose to paint the whole wall one colour, or you can use a few different paint colours, paint dots, stripes or squares, or even draw your own unique design to really make this wall the focal point of your home. There’s an endless list of ways that you could choose to add your own creative flair. 6. Share your DIY renovation project We love seeing how you have transformed your home with Richard Burbidge. Upload a picture of your DIY project to Instagram or Facebook and tag us @richard_burbidge. You can also upload your images to our testimonials page here. We can’t wait to see what you create with Richard Burbidge mouldings!  

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How To Fit Skirting Board

A step-by-step guide to fitting skirting board, using Richard Burbidge mouldings and basic woodworking tools and techniques. 1. Choose your Richard Burbidge moulding Firstly you’ll need to decide the style you’re going for – we recommend our ogee, torus or chamfered skirting mouldings for this project. For a traditional style select our torus skirting, or for a contemporary look we recommend chamfered skirting. In this guide we take you through the steps of fitting pine skirting or primed MDF, it is not recommended for pre-finished skirting. View our full range of flooring mouldings here. 2. Where to start We recommend starting from the left-hand side of the door and working your way around the room anti-clockwise, dealing with each corner in turn. Next we must know how to cut the skirting for external and internal corners. We recommend a mitre cut for external corners, and a scribed joint for internal corners as not all walls are at a perfect 90-degree angle. 3. Cutting the moulding for an external corner – mitred Measure the distance to the next corner and mark onto the back of the skirting, and the intended direction of the mitre cut. Next, secure the skirting front facing into the mitre box. Using a panel saw make a 45-degree angle mitre cut in the marked direction. Secure the adjoining skirting board into the mitre box and make a mitre cut in the opposite direction, sand both mitred ends until smooth. Hold both mitred ends together ensuring they fit properly. If the fit isn’t exact you can use a block plane to shave down the ends to achieve a better fit. 4. Cutting the moulding for an internal corner – scribed joint First, take one of the 2 pieces that will form the internal corner and cut to size with a straight cut, so the end is flush to the wall. Then place this piece at a 90-degree angle onto the face of the second piece of skirting, and draw around the profile onto the face of the piece you will be cutting. Using a coping saw carefully saw around the profile mark you have just drawn, to create a scribed joint. Position both skirting boards together in the internal corner, ensuring that the scribed joint fits into the profile of the skirting. If the fit isn’t exact, lightly sand down the end to achieve a better fit. Remember to make the cut at the other end of the skirting before fitting them to the wall. 5. Securing the moulding to the wall The preferred option when securing the skirting is adhesive, as it allows for a clean and professional finish. If your wall isn’t completely straight you may want to use another applying method alongside the adhesive. Starting from the left-hand side of the door, apply grab adhesive to the back of the skirting and apply PVA to any external mitres, and carefully apply to the wall. If using an additional applying method, use a pipe detector before nailing or drilling into any walls. If fixing to a stud wall, use a stud detector to locate the vertical timber studs, hammer lost head nails through the skirting into the timber studs. If fixing to a masonry wall use a masonry drill, making sure to countersink the screw holes so that the screws are hidden. Use flexible decorators caulk to fill the gap between the top of the skirting and wall, wipe any excess with a damp cloth to smooth the surface. 6. Add the finishing touches Once the skirting is applied, use decorators caulk to patch any gaps, cracks, or holes prior to finishing. You have many different options when finishing pine skirting, you can stain for a traditional look, paint for a contemporary finish, or choose to retain the original look of raw pine. These little finishing touches are where you can make the skirting your own, and tie in with your chosen decor. If you decide to stain or leave as it is, we recommend sealing the surface with a varnish or oil. For primed MDF skirting we recommend painting. 7. Share your DIY renovation project We love seeing how you have transformed your home with Richard Burbidge. Upload a picture of your DIY project to Instagram or Facebook and tag us @richard_burbidge. You can also upload your images to our testimonials page here. We can’t wait to see what you create with Richard Burbidge mouldings!  

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